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Shoulder Dystocia

We have handled many complex birth injury cases

Shoulder dystocia is associated with an increased risk of birth injury to both the mother and baby.

Overview

Birth injuries are physically and emotionally traumatic for the injured and their families. Unfortunately, every day in the United States, mothers and babies are injured as a result of the medical malpractice of healthcare professionals during pregnancy or labor and delivery. One type of birth injury that can occur is an injury to the brachial plexus nerves, which is usually associated with a condition called shoulder dystocia. Shoulder dystocia, and how it is handled by a delivery team, can increase the risk of a birth injury to a mother or baby if it is not managed appropriately.

Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery in which one of the baby's shoulders becomes stuck on the mother’s pubic bone as the baby travels down the birth canal. When shoulder dystocia occurs, it is a medical emergency, requiring the delivery team to act quickly and appropriately to deliver the baby safely. Unfortunately, this emergency is not always handled appropriately, and medical professionals may act negligently in their delivery and cause significant injuries to the mother and baby. 

Injuries as a result of shoulder dystocia can have lifelong effects for both injured patients and their families, including ongoing medical care and expenses, physical discomfort, and emotional trauma. When families face this suffering as a result of the malpractice of medical professionals, they deserve to be compensated for the harm caused. The attorneys at Morris James can help.

At Morris James, our attorneys have been standing up for victims since we opened our doors in 1932. If you have questions about shoulder dystocia, you can find more information in our Shoulder Dystocia FAQs. Our experienced birth injury attorneys are also available to talk to you at this difficult time. Contact us online or call us at 302.655.2599.

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